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History of Uno Card Game

Like playing UNO ? this is the story about UNO. After having an argument with his son about Crazy 8's, Merle Robbins, a barbershop owner and card lover, invented UNO in 1971 in Reading, Ohio. He introduced the game to his family, and after they started playing the game more and more he decided to have the game printed. His family pooled together $8,000 to have 5,000 games made. At first Merle sold UNO from his barbershop. A few friends and local businesses sold them too. Merle sold the rights to a funeral parlor owner in Joliet, Illinois. The cost? $50,000 plus royalties of 10cents per game. International Games Inc. was formed to market UNO, and sales skyrocketed. In 1992, International Games became part of the Mattel family, and UNO had a new home.

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2 comments:

SO1RainMaker said...
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SO1RainMaker said...

The actual location was Arlington Heights, Ohio. A Cincinnati Suburb in the same local region shared with Reading, Lockland, and Lincoln Heights. This area is often bundled together and referred to as either Cincinnati, or simply Reading, Ohio. This really depends on if you are a resident of Reading, or the other suburbs I just mentioned. Each of these communities is proud of their own, and make it a point they are not Reading, or Cincinnati.
..and so, After an argument with his son, Mr. Robinson in fact did create the game UNO. Mr. Robinson's Barber Shop was located on the corner of Carthage Ave in Arlington Heights. The concept was conceived, and the game was developed at Lichty's Tavern across the street from the Barber shop. Of course for a $1.49 you buy a Deck of Uno cards from the barbershop, but if you wanted to play the game, you could always go next door to Lichty's Tavern. There patrons could often be heard shouting "UNO" while waiting for their number to be called.
According to John Robinson, son of Merle, his father set up an intercom between the barbershop and Lichty's. The barbershop was often full,so he would give customers a number, send them to Lichty's for some fun, maybe a cold beer or whatever, and a game of UNO. When it was their turn, Mr.Robinson would use the intercom to call their number.

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